COREFX® Core Stability, Rotation, and Anti-Rotation Training – Part 3

by Corefx

See Parts 1 and 2 of this series for an overview of core stabilization, rotary and anti-rotation training, as well as video clips of exercises that complement the final installment of Part 3 of this series.

Core Stabilization and Anti-Rotation Exercise

Following are four exercise progressions that can help athletes develop core control, whether the goal is to stabilize, resist spinal rotation or contribute to global rotary movement (e.g., baseball swing, throwing motion or punch).

Note: Utilize the COREFX Advanced Toner

  1. Split Stance Progression with Lateral Line of Force (LOF)

    Utilize a split stance and a lateral line of force/pull to start the progression.

    1) Begin the movement with a down/up (triple flexion and extension) motion. Avoid folding at the waist. Push the hands away from the chest to increase challenge. Bring the arms in close to the chest to make the exercise easier and to lessen the rotational force from the line of force (LOF).

    2) Repeat with the other leg forward.

    3) Progress to a jump-switch (jump and exchange legs) while maintaining arm positioning at the center-line of the body. A mini regression that can be performed before transitioning to the jump-switch would be to alternately walk-exchange the legs before adding the dynamic leg-switch.

    *Most exercises can be varied by changing line of force resistance (more or less load), arm position (e.g., overhead, front)/lever length (e.g., flexed or extended), degree of range-of-motion at the ankle, knee and hip, and/or adding directional line of force changes (e.g., front, back, side/lateral, variable).

  2. Squat Jump/Push-Away with Lateral Line of Force (LOF)

    The Squat Jump/Push-Away progression begins with an understanding that the most stable position for this exercise set up is with the arms positioned close to the chest and the feet straddled in a wide, squat position.

    Start the Squat Push-Away progression 1) grounded (no jump or propulsion), then move to 2) Squat Jump-Together Push-Away (return with a walk) and finally, perform the 3) Squat Jump/Jump Push-away (jump feet together and push the arms out–into and out of stable (feet wide, arms close to torso) and unstable (feet together, arms pushed away from torso) positions. Maintain arm position at the center-line of the body for all variations.

    *Most exercises can be varied by changing line of force resistance (more or less load), arm position (e.g., overhead, front)/lever length (e.g., flexed or extended), degree of range-of-motion at the ankle, knee and hip, and/or adding directional line of force changes (e.g., front, back, side/lateral, variable).

  3. Pillar of Strength

    Stand with your arms overhead and in a wide, athletic stance. Utilize a rear line of pull that exerts force diagonally from high to low. Set neutral posture by bracing the core and scapulae.

    1) Begin by walking away from line of force, while maintaining postural alignment and core bracing. Move from a wide stance, and step forward to a narrow stance (feet together). This increases the core bracing challenge because of the increase in line of force that occurs when walking from the toner attachment point.

    2) Progress to a jump/return, while maintaining overall body positioning and control. Move from a wide, athletic stance, and jump forward to a narrow landing, with the feet together. Maintain balance and alignment throughout the movement.

    *Most exercises can be varied by changing line of force resistance (more or less load), arm position (e.g., overhead, front)/lever length (e.g., flexed or extended), degree of range-of-motion at the ankle, knee and hip, and/or adding directional line of force changes (e.g., front, back, side/lateral, variable).

  4. Overhead Split Stance Progression with Lateral Line of Force (LOF)

    Utilize a split stance and a lateral line of force/pull to start the progression. Move the heads from a front to overhead position.

    1) Begin the movement with a pulsing down/up (triple flexion and extension at the ankle, knee and hip) motion. Avoid folding at the waist and resist the lateral (lateral spinal flexion) line of pull.

    2) An optional regression before jumping and exchanging legs, and not seen on the video clip, would be to walk (less dynamic) the leg exchange while keeping the arms overhead.

    3) Complexity increases with a dynamic switch-jump lunge where the legs switch alternately from front-to-back. Control the landing and take off positioning, and maintain whole body alignment while the body is airborne. Maintaining alignment in the air is difficult because the feet are not anchored.

    *Most exercises can be varied by changing line of force resistance (more or less load), arm position (e.g., overhead, front)/lever length (e.g., flexed or extended), degree of range-of-motion at the ankle, knee and hip, and/or adding directional line of force changes (e.g., front, back, side/lateral, variable).

Summary

Being able to reflexively (without thinking) control and maintain spinal positioning as demanded by sport and activities of daily life is an important skill set. Having the ability to stabilize the spine and resist spinal rotational forces, as well as contribute to global rotation of the body (e.g., throwing, hitting a baseball, kicking, serving a tennis ball)–represents key foundations that must be developed to help prepare the body for precise, safe and performance driven movement.

See Parts 1 and 2